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   Welcome to my online gallery. My belief is that art is an extension of one's self - I know this is a cliche statement you might hear any flowery artist say, but it's really true. Those who have met me know I'm not a flowery artist...in fact most who have met me wouldn't pick me for an artist because I don't have the persona of the typical artist.

   I started drawing as a child - a small child, actually. I went through the motions of "art school" by attending a public school program for gifted artists at Overton High School in Memphis, Tennessee. I really disliked the whole thing, to tell the truth. I do my work as a soloist. Having an art teacher tell me I put a line in the wrong place was ridiculous to me, but I grinned and lived through the experience. I never attended any art college. What you see here is one percent technique and 99 percent raw ability with practice.

   I don't generally do color - I'm colorblind to the point that I still have a lot of trouble with color even in general things. I was given a gift of talent and the joke of not being able to use it well with color at the same time. You could say I was a fun experiment. In part because of my color handicap I use my art talent sparingly, in fact I haven't really done anything in many years...until 2005.

   I am a Lincoln cent specialist...that's right, the coin. I am a numismatist - I study coins. I needed a good rendition of the designer of the Lincoln cent, Victor Brenner. I couldn't find anything I wanted to use, so I drew him instead. When I showed the drawing around, I was talked into making and selling prints of the drawing. That started a series of designers and made me realize that my talent should be shared, so I built this, and here we are.

   My work is shown below with a button to press for each one if it's still available for sale. Thank you for looking....cd.

Hermon Atkins MacNeil
11x14 - pencil on Strathmore 300 Bristol paper
release date: 23 November, 2010

   Seventh in the series of coin designers, Hermon Atkins MacNeil was the designer of the Standing Liberty Quarter. This rendition of the artist with his original work (design later changed) has been a long time coming. Due to health problems and restarting three times due to damaged art work, this one has taken nearly four years to release. Get your print today before they run out!

Limited to 250 hand signed, numbered prints.

11x14 print - $59 including delivery.

Adolph A. Weinman
11x14 - pencil on Strathmore 300 Bristol paper
release date: 25 October, 2006

   Sixth in the series of coin designers, Adolph Weinman was the designer of the Walking Liberty half dollar and the Winged Head Liberty Dime (more commonly referred to as the Mercury dime). This drawing, in the artist's opinion, is the best released in this series to date, and may remain the frontispiece of the series. Get this one while it is still available!

Limited to 250 hand signed, numbered prints.

11x14 print - $69 including delivery.

James Earle Fraser
11x14 - pencil on Strathmore 300 Bristol paper
release date: 31 August, 2006

   Fifth in the series on coin designers is the designer of the buffalo nickel. Well known as an artist in his own right, Fraser only has this one regular issue coin to his credit.

By special request from Whitman Publishing, this drawing was completed as the fifth in the series, and will be featured in an upcoming book. As with the others, only 250 signed and numbered prints will be made.

Limited to 250 hand signed, numbered prints.

11x14 print - $49 including delivery.

John Flanagan
11x14 - pencil on Strathmore 300 Bristol paper
release date: 06 March, 2006

   Continuing the series on U.S. coin designers, this famous American sculptor and medal designer designed only one coin used in commerce in America. Fortunately, though, it is the one coin considered the "workhorse" of our economy, the Washington Quarter Dollar. Flanagan's monacle and peaceful demeanor shows well in this work.

By special request from Q. David Bowers, this drawing was completed as the fourth in the series, and will be featured in an upcoming book authored by this numismatic giant. As with the others, only 250 signed and numbered prints will be made available to the public.

Larger image of this drawing.
detail of the face.
detail of the quarter bust.

Limited to 250 hand signed, numbered prints.

11x14 print - $69 including delivery.

James Barton Longacre
11x14 - pencil on Strathmore 300 Bristol paper
release date: 28 January, 2006

   Third in the coin designers series, James B. Longacre was the chief engraver of the U.S. Mint throughout much of the second half of the 19th century. He designed more of our circulating coins than any other person in history. Most of his designs are shown in this work. This particular drawing is the most challenging (and now rewarding) work of art I have ever attempted.

Larger image of this drawing.
detail of the face.
detail of the right side of the drawing.

Limited to 250 hand signed, numbered prints.

11x14 print - $69 including delivery.

Augustus Saint Gaudens
11x14 - pencil on Strathmore 300 Bristol paper
release date: 21 November, 2005

   The second in a series of coin designers. Augustus Saint Gaudens made some of the most influential coin designs of the 20th century. In my opinion he was one of the best sculptors to come into the US coin scene. My rendition of him is as a young man even though his designs ($10 indian on the left, $20 on the right) weren't incorporated until the year of his death. I did it this way to show my feeling that his designs were young and fresh - as he had been at some point in his life.

Larger image of this drawing.
detail of the indian and Saint Gaudens' face.
detail of the right side of the drawing.

Limited to 250 hand signed, numbered prints.

11x14 print - $69 including delivery.

Victor David Brenner
11x14 - pencil on Strathmore 300 Bristol paper
release date: 05 November, 2005

   The first in a series of coin designers. Victor David Brenner led a quite fascinating life after being discovered as a sculptor, but had gotten there by selling matches on the street corner. An immigrant from Lithuania, he ended up going to school in the US and was commissioned by President Theodore Roosevelt for his one work of numismatic fame, the Lincoln cent. I included the small Lincoln cent bust in this drawing to show that even though the Lincoln cent was what we remember him for, I believe to him it was just another piece. In this work, I made Brenner the focus, not his work. It seems to me that we have always focused more on the work than the artist in this case. This is obvious by the relatively small number of images available of the designer himself compared to the vast number of images available of his work. I dare say Brenner's work is one of the most duplicated works of art in history, but his likeness is nothing more than an afterthought in most arenas.

Larger image of this drawing.
detail of the beard and Lincoln's bust.
detail of the eyes.

Limited to 250 hand signed, numbered prints.

11x14 print - $69 including delivery.

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